Clare K. R. Miller

Chatoyant College Book 13: Chapter 41: Be Careful

Advertisements

Edie’s heart dropped in her chest. They were obviously going about this all wrong. “Then it’s not us you need to talk to,” she said. “Professor Strega, hasn’t Roe told you about this recurring vision she’s been having?”

Professor Strega frowned. “I have not had much chance to speak with Roe recently. We plan to meet tomorrow at noon.”

Corrie shook her head. “She did say that she’s planning to talk to you about it at that meeting, but she was glad to have it rescheduled… well, anyway, the important thing is that she says the vision is just teeth. That’s all she can ever remember from the visions.”

All the professors tensed. Professor Rook’s knuckles tightened on his coffee cup. “She should have told us about this before now!”

“She didn’t know how important it was,” Corrie said sharply. “And it might not be. Who knows if it’s the same teeth?”

“It seems likely,” Ginny said. “A recurring vision is unusual.”

“I will speak to her tomorrow and find out what I can,” Professor Strega said. “We may be able to induce the vision to return with more detail. We shall see.” She had slumped back in her chair with one arm crossed over her chest, her hand holding her shoulder.

“So you don’t need us,” Dawn said.

“We may need you more than ever,” Professor Lal said. “Especially you, Dawn. You are the only one who can see through whatever glamour this faerie may be using. If it is still on campus—and the likelihood seems now to be that it has not left—then you may be able to find it.”

“I thought you didn’t want us to hunt it.”

“Just keep an eye out,” Ginny said.

Dawn shook her head, spreading her hands wide in a helpless shrug. “You don’t think I always have my eye out for faeries on this campus? How am I supposed to look when I don’t know what I’m looking for?”

“Or where,” Edie added. “Except for outside, at night… and we know it’s dangerous to be out alone at night. We’ve always known that, but a lot of other people are figuring it out, too.”

“That is good,” Professor Strega said. “We do not know if this faerie solely attacks those who are out alone at night, or if that condition is sufficient for an attack, but it can only be safer to stay in groups.”

“I could try watching with distance sight,” Corrie said, frowning. “I don’t know if that’s the best way. Professor Rook, you must be better at it…”

He shook his head. “You have a great natural talent, Corrie. I cannot match it. If you could look over the campus at night with your distance sight, that would only be helpful.”

“And then if I see anything weird, I could tell Dawn to look there,” Corrie said, glancing over at Dawn. “But we’d have to go there.”

“We will be with you,” Professor Lal said quickly. “I will write up a schedule of when each of us will be in our offices, and I think in this situation, at least one of us should be in the office all night. If you see anything that makes you think it must be investigated, call.”

Dawn nodded. “That sounds like a good plan. I wouldn’t be willing to go investigate this faerie with just two or three of us. But we’ll have iron with us, of course.” She touched the iron bracelet that she wore on her wrist.

“There is no guarantee that iron will protect you, but it is better to have that than nothing,” Professor Rook said.

Edie leaned back against the couch cushions. She felt a bit small and useless, though she was glad not be asked to go into danger. Then again, when Corrie and Dawn did go out to look for the faerie attacker, it wasn’t like she was going to let them go without her. “Is there anything I can do?” she asked.

“What you should do is be extremely careful and never go anywhere alone, especially at night,” Ginny said. “We have no specific reason to believe that this faerie will attack someone of mixed heritage like you, but you have been targeted before due to your mixed heritage. I understand that there is something about you that attracts the attention of faeries.”

Professor Lal gave a short nod, confirming Ginny’s words. “Until we understand the attacker’s motivations, we cannot assume anything,” she added.

Corrie put her arm around Edie’s. “I guess we’re sticking with you all the time.”

Edie smiled. “I can handle that.”

“I have another question,” Dawn said. “Have you asked the old faerie woman at the end of the hall for help? Can’t she find anything?”

“We have asked her and you should continue to leave her alone,” Professor Lal said. “As we do not have the identity of the faerie, she cannot find anything. If we can learn its identity, she may be able to track it down.”

“Then I guess we have a plan,” Corrie said.

“I will speak with Roe tomorrow,” Professor Strega said. “Perhaps she will be able to help.”

“We’ll be in touch,” Professor Lal said. “And be careful.”

Advertisements